JennyHats, Our Guest Blogger!

 

Happy Monday! To celebrate the start of a new week, we have a special treat here at A Good Look — we have our first GoodwillNyNj Creates guest-blogger post, and it’s really, really cool.

jennyhats

If you’ve ever decided to knit a scarf, you know that the material to make them can get incredibly costly — we’ve seen balls of yarn go for $45 a skein, and that wouldn’t even make enough scarf to cover our clavicle, let alone bundle us up for a winter storm.

Well, JennyHats had a great idea – why not buy the yarn from Goodwill… in the form of recycled, cost-effective, cozy sweaters? You’ll be saving money and promoting sustainability. And no matter how cold out, we think that’s pretty darn hot.

Without further ado, then, here is Etsy crafter and graphic designer JennyHats‘ GoodwillNyNj Creation. Just click the MORE button below and enjoy!:

I wish I could say that the holiday season is quickly approaching, but I’m sure you’ve all noticed it’s already here.  If you’re like me, your list of people to give to expands every year, and while we’re all grateful to have more friends than we started with in 2009, showing your appreciation to them can sometimes wreak havoc on your wallet.

That’s why a lot of people turn to handmade goodies.  Nothing shows how much you love a person more than a carefully hand-crafted pair of socks, right? Or devoting all your time and energy into a beautiful hat and scarf set.  Or maybe some fingerless gloves for your favorite cold-ridden smoker.

But the truth is, making your gifts by hand can not only eat away at your time, but also your budget. If you start early enough (and now is not too late!), you don’t have to worry about time.  But what about paying $5 for a skein of yarn?  And that’s the cheap kind.  Depending on whether or not you knit or crochet, you’ll need even more skeins, and you might want to give the people you love something nicer than yarn that will scratch their heads because it was all you could afford.

That’s why I’m going to tell you today about recycling yarn from old sweaters.  Seriously.  It can be done.

I had found these instructions awhile back, and had always wanted to try it.  With a couple dollars and a trusty set of tiny scissors, I was able to take what once was a comfy, soft sweater (albeit kind of matronly) and turn it into a cute hat that could look nice on my younger cousin, or stash it away as one of those “Oh no, I wasn’t aware that we were exchanging gifts this year, so let me visit my trusty extra gifts box” gifts.  And, if anything, I paid less for the entire sweater than I would have for the skein of yarn to make it. Take that, craft stores!

Now, this was my first time doing this, and it did come slow to me at first; that said, this could easily become a cheap and fun way to build up your stash for last-minute holiday projects – especially if you’re like me and found a sweater with a bulkier-weight yarn.  You’ll have hundreds of hats whipped up in no time!  Or scarves, mittens, headbands… whatever your heart desires!  It’s also a good way to use up scraps, as I did in the hat pictured above, to use as accent colors to the main garment you decide to make.

The fact of the matter is this: there are some really pretty yarns available that have been used in some hideous sweaters.  Don’t let that yarn go to its grave thinking, “This is all I’m ever going to amount to!”  Why not turn those sweaters into something that can be loved and cherished for a couple more years to come?

So to those of you into fiber arts, I say: visit your local Goodwill and breathe some new life into old, fabulous yarns. You won’t regret it 😀

 

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